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William Gibson's Alien 3

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This is the official adaptation of the original screenplay for Alien 3, written by William Gibson, the award-winning science fiction author of the cyberpunk cult classic Neuromancer. You'll see familiar characters and places—but not all is the same in this horrifying Cold War thriller! After the deadly events of the film Aliens, the spaceship Sulaco carrying the sleeping bodies of Ripley, Hicks, Newt This is the official adaptation of the original screenplay for Alien 3, written by William Gibson, the award-winning science fiction author of the cyberpunk cult classic Neuromancer. You'll see familiar characters and places—but not all is the same in this horrifying Cold War thriller! After the deadly events of the film Aliens, the spaceship Sulaco carrying the sleeping bodies of Ripley, Hicks, Newt, and Bishop are intercepted by the Union of Progressive Peoples. What the U.P.P. forces don't expect is another deadly passenger that is about to unleash chaos between two governmental titans intent on developing the ultimate cold war weapon of mass destruction. Collects William Gibson's Alien 3 #1–5.


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This is the official adaptation of the original screenplay for Alien 3, written by William Gibson, the award-winning science fiction author of the cyberpunk cult classic Neuromancer. You'll see familiar characters and places—but not all is the same in this horrifying Cold War thriller! After the deadly events of the film Aliens, the spaceship Sulaco carrying the sleeping bodies of Ripley, Hicks, Newt This is the official adaptation of the original screenplay for Alien 3, written by William Gibson, the award-winning science fiction author of the cyberpunk cult classic Neuromancer. You'll see familiar characters and places—but not all is the same in this horrifying Cold War thriller! After the deadly events of the film Aliens, the spaceship Sulaco carrying the sleeping bodies of Ripley, Hicks, Newt, and Bishop are intercepted by the Union of Progressive Peoples. What the U.P.P. forces don't expect is another deadly passenger that is about to unleash chaos between two governmental titans intent on developing the ultimate cold war weapon of mass destruction. Collects William Gibson's Alien 3 #1–5.

30 review for William Gibson's Alien 3

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    I'll give this an extra star just because this is a fantastic idea, to turn unproduced screenplays that fans would love to read as comic books. As a long time fan of the Alien franchise, I was really excited to read this. Alien 3 is not a very good movie, even with David Fincher behind it. I will say this script has absolutely nothing to do with the Fincher movie. It's a completely different direction. This story has a lot of issues. At the time, the studio told Gibson to sideline Rip I'll give this an extra star just because this is a fantastic idea, to turn unproduced screenplays that fans would love to read as comic books. As a long time fan of the Alien franchise, I was really excited to read this. Alien 3 is not a very good movie, even with David Fincher behind it. I will say this script has absolutely nothing to do with the Fincher movie. It's a completely different direction. This story has a lot of issues. At the time, the studio told Gibson to sideline Ripley so she's in a coma for the entire book. Newt, Hicks, and Bishop thankfully do get some love. The Xenomorphs have these new powers that make absolutely no sense. (Even if they do make for some neat scenes.) Johnny Christmas's art is pretty good. Christmas made a mistake keeping the same structure as the movie though. The script jumped back and forth between multiple characters and even ships, which can work in a movie because it's easier to tell we've switched scenes. It made this impossible to follow though as the pages bounced back and forth between 10 and 15 different characters. It was often unclear we had switched to a new scene and I was flipping back and forth to figure out what happened. Restructuring the screenplay into a more narrative order would have made for a better comic.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)

    You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. Following the incredible success of both the original Alien (1979) movie directed by Ridley Scott and its sequel Aliens (1986) directed by James Cameron, it was only a matter of time before another project was set loose at the box office to further explore the horrifying world filled with xenomorphs. Unfortunately, the third installment knew more problems than mankind could ever deal with, as issues during production arose from left and right, shooting began You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. Following the incredible success of both the original Alien (1979) movie directed by Ridley Scott and its sequel Aliens (1986) directed by James Cameron, it was only a matter of time before another project was set loose at the box office to further explore the horrifying world filled with xenomorphs. Unfortunately, the third installment knew more problems than mankind could ever deal with, as issues during production arose from left and right, shooting began without a script to help it, and countless screenwriters and directors were recruited for this movie. In his directorial debut, director David Fincher sees himself attributed the burden to launch this sequel and suffers through an underperforming and poorly-received movie that however didn’t stop him from later releasing some of the best movies cinema has ever witnessed. What is Alien 3 about? This unproduced screenplay is author William Gibson’s second draft for the movie. While both his first draft (can be found online here) and his second draft were turned down by studios, he was now invited to produce a graphic novel based on the second script for fans to discover what he originally planned for a sequel to Aliens. Set during the Cold War, the story begins with the Union of Progressive Peoples intercepting the spaceship Sulaco, carrying Ripley, Hicks, Newt, and Bishop. Within the ship, another deadly passenger happens to also be patiently waiting, looking for the perfect opportunity to reign havoc. While two of the most powerful governments are looking to develop a weapon of mass destruction, their project will have to be put to the side as they try and deal with the nastiest alien threat they will ever face. If you think Willaim Gibson’s screenplay is anything like the movie, think again. The script utilized for this graphic novel completely reimagines the franchise’s direction and invites readers to forget anything they’ve learned about the creatures to even enjoy this adventure a little. One of the biggest change is how Ripley, while present in this story, isn’t the main protagonist and is actualize quickly disposed of—not literally—halfway in. It was already a big move in the movie when Ripley was quickly made the center of attention as the rest of the crew was removed from the picture, but this time around, fans won’t have any known figures to truly follow as they are forced to reacquaint themselves with new figures who are completely uninteresting. If that wasn’t enough, the story also gives the xenomorphs new abilities that are absolutely insane. They aren’t just creatures that look for incubators in living beings in order to grow at an exponential rate, this time around they also have mutating powers that appear out of the blue, making them threats à la Terminator. As much as I love when a world expands and the story brings in new key components to play with, this seemed like an extremely ambitious idea that steered the original plotline into directions that are beyond anyone’s understanding. Would it have made for a better movie than what we got with Alien³, I doubt it. The artwork that accompanies this story is still decent with excellent and vibrant colouring that offers clear visuals that make it easy to follow the action. It’s in the structure of the story that it, however, suffers immensely with the story alternating points of view too often for anything to seem fluid. From one page to another, the story can shift perspectives, leaving no room for the reader to really grasp the context. With a lot of elements left aside for readers to deduce—actually, to guess—the artwork could never save the story even if the artists wanted to. Even the design of the xenomorphs is different and that’s something you just shouldn’t touch. Alien 3 is a high-reaching proposal that completely reshapes the xenomorph’s lore with new creatures, characters, and environments, without staying loyal to the original premise. Yours truly, Lashaan | Blogger and Book Reviewer Official blog: https://bookidote.com/

  3. 4 out of 5

    Roy

    Pretty dissapointing Aliens story. No Ripley slow plotting and weird aliens that aren't the aliens. Kinda see why this wasnt made into a film

  4. 5 out of 5

    Craig

    I was hoping for the sequel that Aliens really deserved and there are moments in this, but it is still kind of a mess. Gibson says in an introduction that it was his first attempt at a screenplay and "work for hire," and he does a pretty good job, but there are some weird things here that just don't fit with the earlier iterations of the story (such as the alien lifecycle, which is quite a bit different this time out). Also, it's quite strange that Ripley is not really present at all, other than I was hoping for the sequel that Aliens really deserved and there are moments in this, but it is still kind of a mess. Gibson says in an introduction that it was his first attempt at a screenplay and "work for hire," and he does a pretty good job, but there are some weird things here that just don't fit with the earlier iterations of the story (such as the alien lifecycle, which is quite a bit different this time out). Also, it's quite strange that Ripley is not really present at all, other than as a comatose survivor of the Sulaco who is off to the side of things through most of the book (Newt makes more of an impact before being shipped off for home). Bishop and Hicks have the most to do, along with a new cast of characters, including some Marxist space colonists on their own space station and the crew of a Weyland-Yutani space station in danger of being mothballed. The script could still use some work--it isn't always clear who's who or just what the heck is going on (there are a couple of alien burst out scenes that look like they belong more in John Carpenter's version of The Thing than anything Alien-related). The artwork is pretty good throughout, though can be a bit sketchy at times. Also interesting to see how this first attempt (with some revisions and polish) ultimately evolved into the weirdness that was David Fincher's Alien 3.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tiago

    Good call on not picking this up for the third movie, its not a bad horror story, but its certainly not Alien material. There's some major flaws here, some that could even ruin the franchise in the process, for one there's the new Alien transformation, which makes absolutely no sense, its like Gibson didn't even watched the previous movies, the red-eyed Alien was totally random, and not using Ripley for the entirety of the story, goddamn... she's the main hero of the original series dude, you do Good call on not picking this up for the third movie, its not a bad horror story, but its certainly not Alien material. There's some major flaws here, some that could even ruin the franchise in the process, for one there's the new Alien transformation, which makes absolutely no sense, its like Gibson didn't even watched the previous movies, the red-eyed Alien was totally random, and not using Ripley for the entirety of the story, goddamn... she's the main hero of the original series dude, you don't just leave her on the capsule the whole movie. I'm a huge fan of the entire saga and I regard Alien 3 as the second worst movie in the series, so if Gibson's screenplay doesn't top that, I can't have many good things to say about it, other than its not a bad read, its just not Alien.

  6. 5 out of 5

    J L Shioshita

    So a few things - I'm a big fan of William Gibson, Neuromancer is one of my favorite books and I love the Alien franchise (give or take a few movies in there). I'm in the minority, but I also like the Alien 3 we got in theaters. I understand people's gripes with it, I miss Hicks and Newt too, but I watched the crap out of it in the 90s on a banged up VHS when my parents weren't looking and it holds a strange place in my heart. That being said, I always wanted to know what William Gibson's script So a few things - I'm a big fan of William Gibson, Neuromancer is one of my favorite books and I love the Alien franchise (give or take a few movies in there). I'm in the minority, but I also like the Alien 3 we got in theaters. I understand people's gripes with it, I miss Hicks and Newt too, but I watched the crap out of it in the 90s on a banged up VHS when my parents weren't looking and it holds a strange place in my heart. That being said, I always wanted to know what William Gibson's script would have looked like. So I read this comicbook as it came out, pumped up and ready to have my mind blown. Well...my mind was blown but not in a good way. Maybe the cold war backdrop would have been more meaningful back when it was written, but now it just seems cliched. The xenomorphs have become things from another planet, and specifically for the comicbook version, the layout and plotting from panel to panel was so confusing. When you take a complicated plot with multiple characters who are all drawn to look exactly the same and have forgettable names, and put them all in a comicbook together that jumps all over the place, I had no idea who was who or what was happening. Ripley's not even in it. I liked the individual covers though, but man, what a weird take. By the end of it, I didn't know what had happened, and I read it twice to try and make sure I didn't miss anything.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Stephan

    Why is it that whenever a new chapter in the Alien saga is to be written there’s a need to change the creatures? The first movie portrayed a horrifying monster never seen before. In the second movie they suddenly had a queen. In the third the face huggers could infect more than one host, in the fourth they were cloned and we got a hybrid as well. And don’t get me started on the Aliens vs. Predator mess or *shudder* the Prometheus films. We get the same crap here. Suddenly the Aliens can inf Why is it that whenever a new chapter in the Alien saga is to be written there’s a need to change the creatures? The first movie portrayed a horrifying monster never seen before. In the second movie they suddenly had a queen. In the third the face huggers could infect more than one host, in the fourth they were cloned and we got a hybrid as well. And don’t get me started on the Aliens vs. Predator mess or *shudder* the Prometheus films. We get the same crap here. Suddenly the Aliens can infect humans by releasing spores in the air and having them transform the humans into aliens. There’s even one human who gets turned into an Alien after getting bit by one. I never thought the Aliens were space-werewolves. This is my biggest problem with this story. The way the Aliens infect humans makes the entire cycle of egg-> facehugger-> chestburster obsolete. Why would any of those be needed if it’s enough that the Aliens nibble on a human a bit? Besides the weird evolution of the monsters I found the story hard to follow. We get thrown between different characters and places I can hardly tell apart and everyone’s just running around for no apparent reason. No. This story certainly wasn’t my cup of tea.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    The making of the film Alien 3 is arguably more interesting than the film itself. It went through so many variations, so many writers and directors were attached, multiple ideas were attempted and rejected that it's astounding (or completely unsurprising) that the final product was as lackluster as it was. I really love the idea of going back to original scripts and publishing them, either as books or beautifully illustrated comics as has been done many times before. So, when I heard W The making of the film Alien 3 is arguably more interesting than the film itself. It went through so many variations, so many writers and directors were attached, multiple ideas were attempted and rejected that it's astounding (or completely unsurprising) that the final product was as lackluster as it was. I really love the idea of going back to original scripts and publishing them, either as books or beautifully illustrated comics as has been done many times before. So, when I heard William Gibson's original script for Alien 3 was being adapted for comics, I knew I'd have to get it. He takes the story in a very different direction from the final film, arguably a more interesting one. The biggest drawback is the lack of Ellen Ripley's character, a requirement as Sigourney Weaver wasn't planning on returning at that stage. It does allow Corporal Hicks played by Michael Biehn in Aliens to take a more central role, but his actual character isn't all that fleshed out... he mostly reacts to what's going on around him. The story is much more about biological warfare and combines the horror of the first with the action of the second. Whether it would have worked as a film is anyone's guess but I think it would have been more interesting than the one we got. It also left the door open for what could have been the most interesting sequel of the franchise. The artwork is pretty solid, although of the characters based on actors only Bishop really looks like Lance Henriksen. The variations of the xenomorphs were interesting and I really liked the design of some of the space stations. As a stand-alone sequel to the Alien franchise this book is mildly entertaining, but the appeal of seeing what could have been is the real draw-card.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Zachary

    The story was a bit confusing and the characters had a few solutions that were a little too convenient. Still, I found this to be a lot of fun. I liked seeing Bishop and Hicks more, kinda wish this was the script used for Alien 3.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Toby

    Should be read and enjoyed as a piece of lost film history brought to life, rather than an attempt to reroute the franchise. Gibson's draft script is not the finished article but I still enjoyed the complexity he brings to the Alien-verse, and just like in his novels, the dialogue snaps.

  11. 4 out of 5

    GW Review Dabbler

    William Gibson’s Alien 3 Okay so this isn’t the Hardback Collection, as that isn’t due out till August but the five individual comics that I’ve saved up to read in one go. Now, I’m a self-confessed Alien fan, Aliens is probably my favourite movie of all time and I’ve been waiting for this graphic version since it was announced and waiting for William Gibson’s Alien 3 for even longer. Though I would’ve preferred to see his first draft brought to life which was much more like William Gibson’s Alien 3 Okay so this isn’t the Hardback Collection, as that isn’t due out till August but the five individual comics that I’ve saved up to read in one go. Now, I’m a self-confessed Alien fan, Aliens is probably my favourite movie of all time and I’ve been waiting for this graphic version since it was announced and waiting for William Gibson’s Alien 3 for even longer. Though I would’ve preferred to see his first draft brought to life which was much more like Aliens than Alien. This has its issues, it obviously takes license from Mr Gibson’s story to create a graphic version and the characters do not get enough of an introduction for my liking and it can sometimes be difficult to remember who was who and why they are important and most importantly Bishop, Hicks and Newt(the main reasons I’ve been waiting for this after they were unceremoniously killed off in the film version) do not get anywhere near enough of the story. However, it is entertaining and for any fans of Aliens it is a must read as this is such an important story in the franchise history and helps create the universe that the graphic novels of the last twenty years inhabit. Don’t expect to be wowed but you will enjoy it and I’m going to read again so that I have a better idea of the characters story arcs.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ramon

    To be honest, just the story itself that Gibson came up with is pretty unremarkable, a pretty dry continuation of Aliens but with fewer characters, and an additional political angle. What's surprising is how it actually docks Ripley for 95% of the action. No wonder it wasn't used. Fincher's story was more interesting, even if it was considered mega-dark just for doing away with Newt. But even the adaptation is lacking in places. For one thing some of the characters look too much alike, even in t To be honest, just the story itself that Gibson came up with is pretty unremarkable, a pretty dry continuation of Aliens but with fewer characters, and an additional political angle. What's surprising is how it actually docks Ripley for 95% of the action. No wonder it wasn't used. Fincher's story was more interesting, even if it was considered mega-dark just for doing away with Newt. But even the adaptation is lacking in places. For one thing some of the characters look too much alike, even in the pigmentation of their skin. And some sequences are just oddly laid out, like the wrong moment was chosen for the panel and the flow is not as smooth as desired. Thus, raising suspense and tension in a horror book isn't as effective as in the works of, say, Junji Ito. Though maybe that's a harsh comparison, as he is the best at horror/suspense comics.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ethan

    For the record, I'm one of those weirdos that actually loves Fincher's Alien 3 (the Assembly Cut, at least), but I was still eager to read this as sort of a What If? series or historical artifact for the franchise. There's some really interesting stuff going on here; introducing Space Marxists in a franchise defined by corporate greed is a fascinating move, and in the context of Alien: Covenant there's a neat little aside about how the alien was already genetically engineered as a weapon. That sa For the record, I'm one of those weirdos that actually loves Fincher's Alien 3 (the Assembly Cut, at least), but I was still eager to read this as sort of a What If? series or historical artifact for the franchise. There's some really interesting stuff going on here; introducing Space Marxists in a franchise defined by corporate greed is a fascinating move, and in the context of Alien: Covenant there's a neat little aside about how the alien was already genetically engineered as a weapon. That said, it doesn't read particularly well; it's hard to follow and none of the characters feel like anything more than talking heads, which makes the scary stuff not very scary at all. If you read this like it's any other alien comic, that's ok, but as a continuation of the mainline story, the movie is much better and actually has an ending. If you hated Alien 3 because you wanted more Newt and Hicks and Ripley...this ain't much better, so ymmv.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Alan Teder

    Companion Piece to Alien III: Audible Original Drama Review of the Dark Horse Books graphic novel edition/adaptation (2019) of the unproduced William Gibson screenplay (1987) This Dark Horse graphic novel collects the material from the five floppy comic books William Gibson's Alien 3 #1 to William Gibson's Alien 3 #5 released earlier this year. It also includes a 2 page Introduction/Foreword by William Gibson which provides additional background about his original work on the screenplay. There is also a sect/>Review Companion Piece to Alien III: Audible Original Drama Review of the Dark Horse Books graphic novel edition/adaptation (2019) of the unproduced William Gibson screenplay (1987) This Dark Horse graphic novel collects the material from the five floppy comic books William Gibson's Alien 3 #1 to William Gibson's Alien 3 #5 released earlier this year. It also includes a 2 page Introduction/Foreword by William Gibson which provides additional background about his original work on the screenplay. There is also a section of original sketch and concept art. I am assuming these 2 latter sections are bonus material that were not included in the floppy comic books. The William Gibson introduction is quite fascinating as it provides an insider's view to the screenplay process and the Hollywood machine. Gibson produced the work as a writer for hire and wrote his script according to a treatment (a proposed film synopsis) that he was provided. The decision to leave Ripley in a comatose state for most of the proposed film was therefore not his, but was simply according to the treatment he was responding to. In the end the script he provided did not meet the expectations of the producers as he did not really give it any so-called "cyperpunk" edge that they had thought he would bring to the table. After that early script and several later ones were rejected, the film was finally produced as Alien³ (1992) (the novelization of the David Fincher movie). On the whole I really preferred the Audible Original adaptation as the audio producer Dirk Maggs managed to give Ripley an increased cameo role and also gave more prominent roles to Bishop and Hicks (who were voiced by original Aliens actors Lance Henriksen and Michael Biehn respectively). The graphic novel adaptation does follow the same plotline but I often found the panels confusing and the life-cycle of the alien creatures was all out of wack with the Alien/Prometheus canon. That might have been the case in the audio as well, but it did not jar as much as in a drawn visualization. Bishop was drawn somewhat like Lance Henriksen, but the Hicks character was very generic and did not strike me as anything like Michael Biehn.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Laura Ruetz

    I was so excited for this. Neuromancer by William Gibson is one of my favorite books, it is dark, gritty and utterly riveting. So, a graphic novel treatment of the Aliens 3 script that never saw the big screen, written by William Gibson, yes please! In his forward, he clearly says he had not written a screenplay before, but was excited as he is a fan of the movies. While this has some cool elements, such as a new type of xenomorph (not going to give it away because spoilers suck) but the story i I was so excited for this. Neuromancer by William Gibson is one of my favorite books, it is dark, gritty and utterly riveting. So, a graphic novel treatment of the Aliens 3 script that never saw the big screen, written by William Gibson, yes please! In his forward, he clearly says he had not written a screenplay before, but was excited as he is a fan of the movies. While this has some cool elements, such as a new type of xenomorph (not going to give it away because spoilers suck) but the story itself is a little convoluted and unclear. I had to go back a few times to puzzle out what was happening in a few pages before what I had just read made sense. I just wanted...a little more maybe? The artwork is the best thing about it.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Huffman

    Certainly a fantastic idea. I would love to see all the unproduced versions of Alien 3 given the same treatment (along with other unproduced screenplays I guess) but ultimately it is just kind of boring. Dunno if that’s the comic format’s fault or the fault of Gibson. This having been written in the late 80s, the Cold War biological weapon angle feels on-point, but ultimately I wanted more of that angle fleshed out. Gimme more of the space communists, for fuck sake! Beyond that, it’s a pretty si Certainly a fantastic idea. I would love to see all the unproduced versions of Alien 3 given the same treatment (along with other unproduced screenplays I guess) but ultimately it is just kind of boring. Dunno if that’s the comic format’s fault or the fault of Gibson. This having been written in the late 80s, the Cold War biological weapon angle feels on-point, but ultimately I wanted more of that angle fleshed out. Gimme more of the space communists, for fuck sake! Beyond that, it’s a pretty simple retread of the first film. Team of people on an isolated ship deal with a xenomorph (well, two). This one’s special gimmick is that the the capitalists/Weyland-Yutani group is doing experiments with fusing xenomorph DNA with human DNA and we get a human-skull xenomorph. It looks cool but doesn’t add much and apparently the more hardcore Alien nerds hate it.

  17. 5 out of 5

    J K

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Ripley isn't really in this whatsoever. Shame. The rest is good, interesting ideas. But clearly wanted a sequel or something. Wasted opportunity.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jake Hahn

    This was one of June's free Audible Originals. It is trash just like every other free Audible Original I have ever listened to. Complete waste of time.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    I still remember when I heard that William Gibson was writing the sequel to Aliens. It was the early 90's and I was still high on having finished the awesomeness that was Neuromancer and Count Zero (and Snow Crash, but that is a different author.) Could he bring the same kind of edgy cool that he brought to the cyberpunk genre? Alas, it was not to be, as Alien 3 as filmed went in a different direction. But this book gives us a chance to see what if... The story begins much like the Alien 3 I still remember when I heard that William Gibson was writing the sequel to Aliens. It was the early 90's and I was still high on having finished the awesomeness that was Neuromancer and Count Zero (and Snow Crash, but that is a different author.) Could he bring the same kind of edgy cool that he brought to the cyberpunk genre? Alas, it was not to be, as Alien 3 as filmed went in a different direction. But this book gives us a chance to see what if... The story begins much like the Alien 3 we know: the Sulaco is intercepted on it's trip back to Earth by space Soviets, but maybe the alien queen left a little surprise behind? The survivors - Hicks, Newt and a mostly comatose Ripley - are revived and deal with the repercussions of the events of LV-426 and the alien becomes the focus of a bit of an arms race. Oh and the alien queen did leave a surprise. This was a quick read, very rushed and not detailed at all. In fact, this felt more like a script treatment than an adaption of a full screenplay. There was little to no character development; at times, it was hard to tell who was who. Also after the first chapter, which established the setting, there was little to no detail. Hicks made a good showing, as the book positions him as the hero instead of Ripley, but the other characters are almost interchangeable. No names, an occasional reference to the name of the space station, that's about it. It had more of the feel of the first two Alien movies that what we eventually got and for that alone, I gave it a star. But the muddled and rushed plot, especially at the end made this a little bit more of a letdown. Read it if you want but If you are looking for a better followup to Aliens, check out the original Dark Horse comics.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Aubrey

    As many Alien fans know, there was a script for Alien 3 that was abandoned and we got the Alien 3 we have now. This is that script, as written by William Gibson. Well, this is an adapted version of that script. Personally, I wasn't as enraged as others about Alien 3. There were things I wished differently, like not immediately killing off Newt and Hicks. So I was curious, what was the script that could have been Alien 3. I was excited to check it out! Unfortunate As many Alien fans know, there was a script for Alien 3 that was abandoned and we got the Alien 3 we have now. This is that script, as written by William Gibson. Well, this is an adapted version of that script. Personally, I wasn't as enraged as others about Alien 3. There were things I wished differently, like not immediately killing off Newt and Hicks. So I was curious, what was the script that could have been Alien 3. I was excited to check it out! Unfortunately for me, I see why it wasn't adopted. What bummed me out are a few things. 1) Ripley essentially doesn't exist in this story. She quite literally does nothing. And for me, Ripley is the Alien franchise. 2) Newt is (view spoiler)[sent off halfway through the story, making her existence in the first place not worthwhile (hide spoiler)] . 3) Hicks doesn't behave in a way I would envision him, considering what he had just gone through in Aliens. 4) It also just lacked the story and punch that needed following up to Aliens. I wouldn't recommend it for fans but if you're a fan like me, then I totally understand the desire to check it out.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Joey Nardinelli

    Well this was kind of a bummer. The foreword by Gibson promises an original treatment for Alien 3 that espouses real love for the franchise but I feel like this narrative, as it ended up coming together in this comic, was actually a lot of retread territory already written out in the Alien EU. Some of the stuff with recombinant DNA felt similar to what we’ve seen in Scott’s last two films entries, for better or worse (it actually seems better explained in this graphic novel). I really wish the d Well this was kind of a bummer. The foreword by Gibson promises an original treatment for Alien 3 that espouses real love for the franchise but I feel like this narrative, as it ended up coming together in this comic, was actually a lot of retread territory already written out in the Alien EU. Some of the stuff with recombinant DNA felt similar to what we’ve seen in Scott’s last two films entries, for better or worse (it actually seems better explained in this graphic novel). I really wish the design and layout were a bit more thoughtful, like truncating text bubbles in favor of allowing nameplates or more visually apparent character traits. There were some panels where characters had their eyes or head’s entirely or partially blacked out (maybe to be intriguing?) in ways that made the logical visual read incomprehensible. I also feel like this pushed the body horror into Carpenter territory in a way that felt like it warranted more horror than any characters mustered. It just feels too fast with insufficient character development, and the removal of one core Aliens character felt really moronic given the ability to adapt here. I’m really at the point now where the more and more I dig into the Alien mythos, the less and less I’m enjoying it outside the first two films.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Igor

    It was nice to get a chance to see what Gibson's screenplay might have played out as but having read this it's obvious to me why it wasn't made. First off, Ripley is only technically in it and does nothing, Newt gets shipped off to Earth quickly and we're left with Hicks, who, without Michael Biehn's charisma and performance here is just a generic marine. Bishop is the only one who actually has character. The story starts off very promising and then goes the way of Alien Resurrection. Not to men It was nice to get a chance to see what Gibson's screenplay might have played out as but having read this it's obvious to me why it wasn't made. First off, Ripley is only technically in it and does nothing, Newt gets shipped off to Earth quickly and we're left with Hicks, who, without Michael Biehn's charisma and performance here is just a generic marine. Bishop is the only one who actually has character. The story starts off very promising and then goes the way of Alien Resurrection. Not to mention that it all feels more like set up than a self-contained story. If it was a pilot for a spin-off, it might have worked. But whoever decided to pass on this as a feature wasn't wrong. Simply put: it's just not that good. It has an interesting premise, being for the large part a kind of a political thriller before the xenomorphs start killing people but the first part is let down by the second part where it all feels so muddled and rushed. Maybe Gibson really wanted to make a talky, suspense-y thriller with a very strong Cold War parallel and he forced the action parts in simply because it was expected to. There are some great ideas in here and at least one scene I'd love to see in live action, although I wonder how - if at all - they would be able to do it convincingly with early 90's effects.

  23. 4 out of 5

    GONZA

    I do not usually say that, but this time the movie was better, and it is strange because I had the greatest faith in Gibson.... Per quanto non lo dica quasi mai, stavolta il film era meglio di questo fumetto, nonostante io avessi la piú grande fiducia in Gibson.... THANKS EDELWEISS FOR THE PREVIEW!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    ALIEN 3 is a 1992 American science fiction horror film directed by David Fincher and written by David Giler, Walter Hill and Larry Ferguson from a story by Vincent Ward. It stars Sigourney Weaver reprising her role as Ellen Ripley and is the third film installment in the Alien franchise. In September 1987, Giler and Hill approached cyberpunk author William Gibson to write the script for the third film the Alien Franchise. Gibson by his own admission was a big Alien fanboy wanted to do his thing ALIEN 3 is a 1992 American science fiction horror film directed by David Fincher and written by David Giler, Walter Hill and Larry Ferguson from a story by Vincent Ward. It stars Sigourney Weaver reprising her role as Ellen Ripley and is the third film installment in the Alien franchise. In September 1987, Giler and Hill approached cyberpunk author William Gibson to write the script for the third film the Alien Franchise. Gibson by his own admission was a big Alien fanboy wanted to do his thing and develop his own ideas, which involved a bigger part by Bishop and a lesser involvement of Ellen Ripley. Gibson was aware that the producers might just want a chance of a spark of the big cyberpunk-writer that would be a novel aspect to the franchise. Looking the movie and reading the graphic novel in 5 chapters there is no similarity between the movie and this first movie script by a great writer. Where the movie brings Ripley to a world of prisoners accompanied by of course an Alien critter and shows her demise while protecting the human world from this Alien menace the graphic novel does not. While being homeward bound the Sullaco gets raided by the "Union of Progressive Peoples" (U.P.P.), who are attacked by a facehugger hiding in the entrails of Bishop's mangled body. The soldiers blast the facehugger into space and take Bishop with them for further study. The Sulaco continues its voyage and then arrives at a space station–shopping mall hybrid named Anchorpoint. This unarmed station becomes a labratory for the folks from Weyland-Yutani's bioweapons division. And of course when the aliens get released hell hath no fury but a bloody alien. It is an decent read and the comic is easy to follow and while it takes its time does deliver a decent Alien story but perhaps not spectacular enough for the folks who run the franchise even if Alien and Aliens were tough acts to follow. An interesting bit of Alien franchise was delivered in this short comic series and while I would not have missed out on anything had it never been published it is an interesting exercise and bit of Alien history that is perhaps best enjoyed by Alien franchise fans. Who like their contemporaries from other tv or movie franchises always feel that their person likes are more important than the ones actually holding the reigns of the franchise. A nice little footnote to an interesting franchise.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Edward Taylor

    After reading that there were nearly a dozen different versions of Alien 3 (The Failure of Alien 3) written, I had to try and find them. Some had never been made available but the first writer to try it in 1987 was William Gibson. Gibson, known for his dark and visceral depictions of a dystopian future where technology was invasive and near parasitic part of normal life (he is known for coining the term "cyberpunk" After reading that there were nearly a dozen different versions of Alien 3 (The Failure of Alien 3) written, I had to try and find them. Some had never been made available but the first writer to try it in 1987 was William Gibson. Gibson, known for his dark and visceral depictions of a dystopian future where technology was invasive and near parasitic part of normal life (he is known for coining the term "cyberpunk"), it was thought that he would make an excellent addition to the universe (especially since Camron's action-packed 2nd installment left a lot of questions on the table) but with the Hollywood writers strike came too many issues for the studios to handle. Not to bore people with the history of the strike and what it did nearly destroying the entire entertainment industry, but it caused a lot of scripts and movies to be cast aside, this being one. What we have here is Gibson's take on the universe and cold war that was set deeply between Weyland-Yutani (The Company) and the Union of Progressive Peoples (UPP - Yeah you know me!) in the deepest regions of space. Both of them, through spies and espionage, have found out about the xenomorph and want it for their bio-weapons division. Fun fact: I played in an Alien Universe RPG where I worked for WT's weapons division and worked to find a way to protect and destroy the alien threat as opposed to utilizing it. It was a fun spin on it and someday I hope to write it all down and publish it but until then, you have this short but awesome piece of Alien History. -1 star will not be explained but let's just say you won't get your fill of what you have come to expect in the first two books/movies. I think David Twohy's director's cut was the best of the bunch in the end, but until all of them have been released, I recommend you enjoy Gibson's vision.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Brent Ecenbarger

    As a book or story, there is closer to a three star experience, but as an audible production with Lance Henriksen and Michael Biehn reprising the roles of Bishop and Hicks from the film Aliens I had a hard time not giving this five stars. Although I'm a fan of the move Alien 3, I'm also disappointed that the surviving characters from the prior installment (excepting Ellen Ripley) all die off screen prior to the movie beginning. Apparently, that wasn't the original plan for the movie, and Hugo Award winn As a book or story, there is closer to a three star experience, but as an audible production with Lance Henriksen and Michael Biehn reprising the roles of Bishop and Hicks from the film Aliens I had a hard time not giving this five stars. Although I'm a fan of the move Alien 3, I'm also disappointed that the surviving characters from the prior installment (excepting Ellen Ripley) all die off screen prior to the movie beginning. Apparently, that wasn't the original plan for the movie, and Hugo Award winner William Gibson's script was that plan. Audible has taken the script and remade it into an audio production, complete with the aforementioned recognizable voices, a large cast of supporting characters, and numerous sound effects straight out of the movies. The result was a really quick moving and exciting reading experience. The dialogue driven scenes were excellent across the board, and a few of the action scenes were even great to listen to as well thanks to moments like Biehn's Hicks explaining what he's seeing over a com-link to the other survivors. Still, as huge of an Aliens fan as I am, and as well done as it was, I can't give it five stars because there were also a few actions scenes that were tough to follow without a visual component. The struggle with this made the alien feel absent for much of the production. Also absent, Ellen Ripley, who gets one line of dialogue that's not in flashback. (I didn't mind this as much, because though I love the character we already got her next adventures in film, I was much more interested in seeing the plans for Bishop, Hicks and Newt.) Overall, this was very much worth checking out for fans of the series.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ross Coulbeck

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Just picked up Audible Originals new adaptation of this, and I thoroughly enjoyed it. In my opinion neither of the final two Alien movies were great, so this might have been an interesting direction to go. That said, I can see why they didn't go for it in the end. The lack of Ripley as the main character is probably something they wanted to avoid, they'd rather keep building on her. Which is fine, but giving the spotlight to other characters in this was good too, and she's still 'arou Just picked up Audible Originals new adaptation of this, and I thoroughly enjoyed it. In my opinion neither of the final two Alien movies were great, so this might have been an interesting direction to go. That said, I can see why they didn't go for it in the end. The lack of Ripley as the main character is probably something they wanted to avoid, they'd rather keep building on her. Which is fine, but giving the spotlight to other characters in this was good too, and she's still 'around'. It introduced the UPP faction, which was a nice change of pace, someone actually fighting against Weyland-Yutani. Actually that seemed to be a theme in this, as in the first few minutes of the classic WY scientists arrival, the station chief calls them out on their real agenda. It also showed how the Alien species will adapt to literally any environment or situation to continue to dominate and kill. This time in the form of hybrids, born of Alien DNA splicing itself into human. It was a nice touch, especially when the one 'true' Alien in this see's one and instantly destroys it. One assumes because it's not pure. I got Dalek vibes there. If this was going to be used as the film script, it would have needed tweaking. There were a few points which felt a bit disjointed or weak plot wise. Some of those were probably caused by not seeing it like we would in an actual movie, but others just needed tidying up. But that probably would have happened further down the line if it had been chosen. Overall, a nice addition if you love all things Alien, and an interesting look into a direction the franchise could have gone, that may have been quite interesting.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    So this is the graphic novel version of one of the more infamous scripts of Alien 3 that hit the cutting room floor as there was something like 4-6 scripts that it went through in its very troubled production. So first of all, I liked this overall more than the movie that Alien 3 became. I feel that the movie Alien 3 is nothing more than a terrible rehash of the first movie and the killing off of Newt and Hicks is awful (this movie is 27 years old so I'm not spoiling anything at this point, if y So this is the graphic novel version of one of the more infamous scripts of Alien 3 that hit the cutting room floor as there was something like 4-6 scripts that it went through in its very troubled production. So first of all, I liked this overall more than the movie that Alien 3 became. I feel that the movie Alien 3 is nothing more than a terrible rehash of the first movie and the killing off of Newt and Hicks is awful (this movie is 27 years old so I'm not spoiling anything at this point, if you didn't know that then you never planned to watch it). I do like the scuttling of the prison planet plot and jumping for the anchorpoint thing instead, I do not like the fridge-ing of Ripley for the whole movie, and I also find that it's still close in some spirit to the first Alien movie (Aliens vs. people with no weapons). I'm a bit glad this wasn't made into the movie as when they get the weird Alien-human spliced DNA looking creatures, I feel this would have been laughable in 1992 (it basically becomes this weird mash-up of Alien Meets John Carpenter's the Thing with the body-horror it gets into). Ripley however is the star and most recognizable person in the franchise so not making more of it about her is dumb. However, this version of Alien 3 is better as it would have negated Alien Resurrection (also terrible) and has nothing to do with Ridley Scott's awful prometheus universe he is trying to build (but no one wants).

  29. 4 out of 5

    George Goodall

    NOTE -- this review refers to the Audible production of Alien 3 rather than the graphic novel. William Gibson does Aliens. What's not to like? This story comes from a half-forgotten screenplay that William Gibson put together as a potential sequel to Aliens. The story picks up immediately from the end of the movie and we see the familiar characters: Ripley, Newt, Bishop, etc. The Sulaco is limping its way home but is redirected to a research station by nefarious NOTE -- this review refers to the Audible production of Alien 3 rather than the graphic novel. William Gibson does Aliens. What's not to like? This story comes from a half-forgotten screenplay that William Gibson put together as a potential sequel to Aliens. The story picks up immediately from the end of the movie and we see the familiar characters: Ripley, Newt, Bishop, etc. The Sulaco is limping its way home but is redirected to a research station by nefarious elements within Weyland-Yutani. The xenomorph is aboard, incubated within Bishop's mutilated body. During its journey, the Sulaco passes through (and infects) a part of space that is claimed by a Sino-Cuban-Soviet coalition. The story traces the efforts of two different groups to fight the xenos. The story itself is predictable but I found it incredibly entertaining to learn about the extended adventures of the Sulaco. The Cold War elements of the plot now seem like a particularly novel alternative history, but were simply informed futurism when Gibson put the story together. The Audible production is particularly good because it uses some of the Aliens actors as voice talent (Lance Henrikson and Michael Biehn). 3 stars.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    I remember when I found what purported to be William Gibson's original script for Alien 3 online and I stayed up late to read the whole thing. I barely remember it, but I do remember that it all took place in a swampy planet, so obviously it wasn't the real thing. People talk about executive meddling like it's always a bad thing, but I think in this case it was a...neutral thing? Rather than Hicks and Newt dying in the crash, Ripley spends the entire story in a coma. There are aliens, but due I remember when I found what purported to be William Gibson's original script for Alien 3 online and I stayed up late to read the whole thing. I barely remember it, but I do remember that it all took place in a swampy planet, so obviously it wasn't the real thing. People talk about executive meddling like it's always a bad thing, but I think in this case it was a...neutral thing? Rather than Hicks and Newt dying in the crash, Ripley spends the entire story in a coma. There are aliens, but due to genetic experimentation by Weyland-Yutani and the Union of Progressive People (space commies engaged in a space cold war with the space capitalists in space), they don't need facehuggers to propagate, which changes the dynamics of the story. Bitten is as good as dead. It was also hard to follow the action due to the constant changes in perspective. In a movie, maybe this would be easier to track, but I spent a big chunk of the book a little confused, trying to figure out who was I looking at, who was dying horrible, and what exactly had gone wrong. An interesting curiosity, but not the lost gem some people were hoping for.

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